Double-masked Hong Kong flautist schoolgirls in ad draw ridicule on social media

Social media users have mocked a Hong Kong video of youngsters playing the flute while wearing double masks. Prior to China’s National Day on October 1, the advertisement, produced by Hong Kong’s Education Bureau, was posted online. 

Additionally, it follows an earlier announcement by Hong Kong that Covid restrictions, including masking, would be further extended. It is one of the few cities that still adhere to rigorous Covid regulations after the pandemic.

The “Young China Says” video, which focuses on Hong Kong’s young, features a range of schoolchildren displaying their artistic talents in singing, calligraphy, martial arts, and musical acts.

For the more than five-minute movie, more than 400 students from 41 high schools were invited to take part. On September 21, the Hong Kong Education Bureau released the video in honour of China’s national day, which falls on October 1. 

The video cuts to two masked schoolgirls playing the flute side by side at the 45-second mark, with what looks to be a second flap covering the instrument. Users mocked the advertisement on social media. 

The footage was made available after Hong Kong declared earlier in the week that Covid limitations, such as social withdrawal and the wearing of masks in cars and certain public places, will be in effect until at least October 5.

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When it comes to Covid laws, Hong Kong has closely followed China’s lead. According to economists, this has hurt the economy and reduced Hong Kong’s appeal as a commercial centre. 

Hong Kong is one of the few places in the world that still requires foreign visitors to quarantine upon arrival, though officials are likely to announce an easing of the rule on Friday. 

Since the outbreak, China has maintained a stringent zero-Covid policy that has resulted in rolling lockdowns, severely constrained travel inside the nation, and widespread Covid testing—often on short notice.

(with inputs from agencies)